From their beginnings in this country as enslaved people, through years of struggle for freedom, respect, and equal opportunity, African-American women have traveled a long and difficult road. This full-color paper doll collection pays tribute to that struggle and reflects the role of black women in American society.
Included are 16 costumed dolls — each with one additional costume — depicting such notable African-American women as Phillis Wheatley, an early American poet; Sojourner Truth, preacher and abolitionist; educator Mary McLeod Bethune; twentieth-century novelist Zora Neale Hurston; tennis player Althea Gibson; Rosa Parks, the "mother" of the civil rights movement; opera star Leontyne Price; writer, poet, and actress Maya Angelou; and eight other distinguished women: Pauline Cushman; "Madam" C. J. Walker, Patricia Roberts Harris, Shirley Chisholm, Mae C. Jemison, Barbara Jordan, Judith Jamison, and Toni Morrison.
Carefully researched and accurately illustrated, these figures will provide paper doll enthusiasts with hours of inspirational entertainment as well as giving students of history an opportunity to learn about the lives and careers of a number of America's most distinguished African-American women.

Famous African-American Women Paper Dolls

SKU: 284215376135191
$8.95Price
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Historic House

 

The Museum is currently closed with all staff working remotely, but check our blog and join us as we #MuseumFromHome

10B Crescent Rd.

Greenbelt, MD 20770

Open Sundays 1-5 pm

Admission $5 or under

Contact us to visit or book  tours on other days!

Exhibition Gallery

 

Lenore Thomas Straus Exhibit

Greenbelt Community Center

15 Crescent Rd. 

Greenbelt, MD 20770

Open M-Sat 9am-10pm, 

Sundays 10am-7pm

Greenbelt Museum Office


15 Crescent Road

Greenbelt, Maryland 20770

301-507-6582 

info@greenbeltmuseum.org

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Preserving and sharing the New Deal history of an experimental planned community built by FDR in suburban Maryland in 1937 and still thriving today.